subpop - The I-94 Bar

Exalted blues noise rockers feedtime plan two sets in return to live shows

feedtime bowlo 2setsHey Sydneysiders! After COVID did its best to sink it, the "extreme dream team" pairing of feedtime and Examplehead at Marrickville Bowling Club, originally scheduled for June, has been re-scheduled to January 22...and both bands are determined to make it a very special night.

Ticket numbers were limited for the show that was originally scheduled in June 2021. A handful, surrendered by fans unable to attend the new date, remain for sale online. 
 
Once they're gone, online sales will cease and admission will be $20 at the door on the night, on a "first come, first served" basis, until venue capacity is reached.
 
The other important thing you need to know is that feedtime will play two sets - the first from 8.30pm. Examplehead will follow (approximately 9.30pm) and feedtime will close the night.

feedtime is an institution with their unique and extreme version of the blues being renowned around the world. Formed in Sydney in 1979, they manifested in various line-ups and made it to the USA after the SubPop label re-issued their back catalogue in 2008.

Examplehead were an inner-city staple in Sydney and existed from 1985-90. They lay dormant for 30 years before reforming in 2020, minus late Greg Garnder who passed away three years earlier.

Online tickets are here. If they're gone, join the Facebook eventor mark the date in your calendar - and turn up promptly at 8pm.

Lost My Head For Drink - Bloodloss (Dirty Knobby/SubPop)

lost-my-headFourteen years old by now, "Lost My Head for Drink" sounds both ahead of its time and retro, and has an elusive timeless quality. Who else puts out such a fabulous mixture of mellow tunes and stifling ferocity? Rock discovered parallel with caustic, free-flying jazz? This version of Bloodloss is its own genre. Simple as that.

The Reverend who makes the world a better place

reverend horton heat astrideSo, ho to the Governor Hindmarsh, best rock pub not only in Adelaide but in Australia as far as I’m concerned. Off to see The Rteverend Horton Heat. Dead opposite the monstrous Ent Cent with its vast bowl of an arena, where the punters, grim at the thought of mystery beer in a disposable plastic cup at a fool’s price, head to the Gov for food and drink made by real human beings for real human beings.

It occurred to me tonight, that if I lived around the corner, it’s likely this place would see me once a day for something or other, whether it be for lunch or the occasional after workie, or a slap-up dinner for four mates - rowdy, but still, you know, civilised. The bar staff, without exception, have always been excellent, which is not something you can say of most pubs. Those in the band room tonight are brilliant.

Rockabilly has had a huge revival over the last couple of decades. I remember the first revival, spearheaded by the Stray Cats tour in, I think, 1981; a large number of punker types went and, the following weekend, about five percent were wearing quiffs. And it kinda grew from there, I think, mostly as an underground thing, but it never quite had the spotlight turned on it in the way that the Cats copped it.

But with the Reverend Horton Heat playing alongside what they call “punk rockers” in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, and sharing the same label, Sub-Pop, as Nirvana, when Cobain and co. suddenly broke all over the world, everyone interested in Cobain and co. bought LPs from Sub Pop - and the Heat had a sudden increase in fans world-wide. Without really intending to, Jim Heath (as his custom scratch plate declares) was the spark-plug that triggered an engine of revolution.

I-94 Bar